Posted by: Alexandre Borovik | April 10, 2010

Dynamic Geometry and Dynamic Art

An LKL Maths-Art Seminar
by Kate Mackrell
Tuesday 13 April, 6.00 – 7.30pm

The connections between art and static geometry are rich, diverse, and
well known. Less well known are the possibilities that can arise when
representations of geometric objects are set in motion. Dynamic geometry
software, widely used to facilitate geometry learning in schools, is a
powerful means to achieve this. Even starting from simple initial
situations, beautiful objects emerge, evolve, and transform, and not
only in cases where this might be expected, such as wallpaper patterns,
or stellations, but also in cases, such as truncated polyhedra, where
nothing new is expected, or in solving loci problems or modeling
physical phenomena. The mathematics to create the objects ranges from
quite straightforward, to approximately A level. The mathematics to
understand the objects – well, that’s another story. The software that I
use is Cabri II Plus, Geometer’s Sketchpad, Cabri 3D, and Cinderella.
[See www.lkl.ac.uk/events/maths-art for links to examples of dynamic
art.]


KATE MACKRELL has been playing with geometrical objects ever since her
brothers got their first Lego, and with computers ever since the days
when programs lived on punch cards. After a Master’s degree in general
relativity, she did computer programming before becoming a secondary
school teacher and then working in secondary teacher education. She is
currently doing an M.Phil in mathematics education at the Institute of
Education, exploring ways to facilitate early secondary students in
using Cabri 3D to do creative mathematics.

TIME: 6.00 – 7.30pm, Tuesday 13 April 2010
PLACE: London Knowledge Lab, 23-29 Emerald St, London, WC1N 3QS
[Travel information & maps at: http://bit.ly/LKL-MathsArt-venue ]

All welcome. No reservation required, but an email to
lkl.maths.art@gmail.com would be appreciated for planning purposes

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Responses

  1. The current “De Stijl” exhibition at Tate Modern in London has a 2000 computer video reconstruction of Bauhaus artist Ludwig Hirschfield-Mack’s “Farben-Licht-Spiele” (Colour-Light-Play) from 1923-4. Hirschfield-Mack invented apparatus to display simple 2D geometric shapes (triangles, circles, etc) in different colours slowly shrinking, expanding and changing colours over time. The computer reconstruction is very powerful and hypnotic.


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